Social Media & Society 2013: Five ingredients for an amazing conference

Now that I’ve got your attention, just a quick shameless plug that I’ve updated all the pages under the Research tab with the findings of studies I conducted this past year. Have a read about Facebook’s perilous governance practices, what people think their Likes indicate about them, and how LGBTQ young people deal with context […]

Using digital technologies to research children in time

This is a presentation I gave last week – developed entirely just based on the prescribed title topic. Feel free to skim any of it (with correct attributions) if it applies to your work! Using Digital Technologies to Research Children in Time from Stefanie Duguay   WHY use digital technologies to research children in time?  […]

Queer, Feminist and Social Media Praxis workshop: A diversity of perspectives

This past year, I’ve had trouble referring to my program as ‘Internet studies’ even though it provides a quick alternative to the mouthful that is Social Science of the Internet. Sure, we had to learn about Internet architecture, the actual tubes and wires connecting everything, but really we study people, politics, economics, networks, and interactions on […]

Not ready to throw in the towel yet: Thoughts on Big Data, digital social research, and academia

(Not the future, merely the Gladstone Link) Full disclosure: This was written for a ‘position paper’ assignment in my Digital Social Research course at the OII. The article by Savage and Burrows (2007) plays on an insecurity that haunts me every time I pay my tuition: what ensures that social researchers have valuable, employable skills? […]

Making the Internet Safe: Tying Tim Harford’s thoughts on catastrophic accidents to the web

I just attended a talk from economist/journalist Tim Harford where he likened the financial meltdown (a much more extreme term than governments’ beloved euphemism of ‘economic downturn’) to a catastrophic industrial accident, such as when nuclear reactors go off or oil rigs explode. Through the entire talk all I could think about was how well Harford’s industrial […]

When you’re this big, they call you Big Data*

Upon stepping off the plane from Canada, I was fortunate enough to attend the Oxford Internet Institute’s latest conference: Internet, Politics, Policy 2012: Big Data, Big Challenges.  It was a fascinating gathering of the leading experts in this small but substantially growing field. Since my background is in qualitative methods and I have yet to […]

Research for Breakfast

When I woke up this morning the first thing out of my mouth was, “All I want to do today is watch the Theorizing the Web (TtW) conference and populate my Endnote library.” I’m not sharing this to illustrate my obsession with going back to school (please tell me people still use Endnote – is […]

How to Create a Useful Twitter Network (Stalking for Success)

(Image courtesy of I Can Has Cheezburger) This is just to let you in on a secret: PROFS LOVE TWITTER. Well, not all of ’em, but definitely the ones studying the Internet. When I began my search for potential supervisors at universities across Canada, I realized that looking for professors who study a specific topic […]

If it tweets like a dog…

(Cartoon by Peter Steiner courtesy of Wikipedia) Ever since I began talking about studying the Internet, I’ve had people quoting that phrase to me: “On the Internet, nobody knows you’re a dog.” They quote it when they complain about spam from India; they quote it when remembering remarkable episodes of “To Catch a Predator“; they […]